Caselaw Access Project

Three hundred and sixty years of United States caselaw
A complete collection of published United States caselaw from 1640 to 2017

6.7

Million
Unique cases
627
40M
Reporters
Pages scanned

Our data

State
Overall

6.7M

Unique cases

627

Reporters

40M

Pages Scanned

Federal

1,693,904

Unique cases

32

Reporters

9,547,364

Pages Scanned

Map of USA and territories Map showing a summary of available data Dakota Territory American Samoa Guam Northern Mariana Islands Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Alaska Alabama Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Washington D.C. Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Massachusetts Maryland Maine Michigan Minnesota Missouri Mississippi Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico Nevada New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Vermont Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming

Dive in!

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Start exploring the data! Here are some tools you can use to check it out.
Start exploring the data! Here are some tools you can use to check it out.

Search cases with an intuitive, powerful search engine interface.

Search cases with an intuitive, powerful search engine interface.

Our Tools Page shows the rest of the tools offered by CAP.

Our Tools Page will show you the rest of the great tools offered by CAP.

The API allows users to browse and download cases using a few short commands.

The API allows users to browse and download cases using a few short commands.

Download whole zip files of whitelisted jurisdictions like Illinois.

Historical Trends lets you visualize the use of terms over time in caselaw.

a technician holding disbound pages from a case reporter in front of a high speed scanner
case reporter books in in stacks

Links & Press

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What's been written about Caselaw Access Project around the web
Some content about Caselaw Access Project around the web

‘Improving access to justice is a priority,’ said Martha Minow, dean of Harvard Law School

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